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Homo Iuzonensis: The newest human species discovered
#1
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47873072

News from the Philippines informs us about a new discovery of the newest addition to the human species family tree, Homo Iuzonensis (I'll shorten it to Iuzo for simplicity). It was discovered on the country's biggest island, Luzon. Iuzo's physical features are a mix between ancient human species and modern humans so this suggests that some primitive humans that left Africa long ago arrived in Southeast Asia, something that was thought to not be possible before. Furthermore they were able to travel to Luzon, scientists have many questions as to how this pre-human species could possibly achieve this feat of sailing to the island. Studies suggest that at least three other species were around the same region, one of these being homo floresiensis, nicknamed "The Hobbits". Excavations in Callao Cave present thirteen Iuzo remains: teeth, bones from the hand and foot and part of a femur - from at least three adult and juvenile individuals. Climbing has been speculated as being a very important activity to the Iuzo because of their curved finger and toe bones. I find this discovery fascinating as it expands our current understanding of our lifeless relatives beyond what we already know, we can more accurately predict the order of the events that occurred before our lives that led up to it. Also, the name Iuzonensis sounds pretty gnarly. ;--)
#2
Do you think are close many  decendants of the luzo and could their DNA be genetically engineered to produce more genetically linked zygotes with the luzos.
#3
(04-17-2019, 01:03 PM)Idris_A Wrote: Do you think are close many  decendants of the luzo and could their DNA be genetically engineered to produce more genetically linked zygotes with the luzos.

I definitely believe this is a far stretch. I believe that before we begin to genetically engineer zygotes we have to look at the ethical side of the argument. They are said to be new human species, if we wouldn't genetically engineer human zygotes, why should we do that to them? Furthermore, I don't believe that the added funding which would be necessary to support this research would be worth the investment. I feel like most of the research we need to expand our knowledge about Homo Luzonesis can be done based on the remains that have been found rather than stretching beyond what we need.
#4
(04-21-2019, 11:39 PM)SuhaanaSaini Wrote:
(04-17-2019, 01:03 PM)Idris_A Wrote: Do you think are close many  decendants of the luzo and could their DNA be genetically engineered to produce more genetically linked zygotes with the luzos.

I definitely believe this is a far stretch. I believe that before we begin to genetically engineer zygotes we have to look at the ethical side of the argument. They are said to be new human species, if we wouldn't genetically engineer human zygotes, why should we do that to them? Furthermore, I don't believe that the added funding which would be necessary to support this research would be worth the investment. I feel like most of the research we need to expand our knowledge about Homo Luzonesis can be done based on the remains that have been found rather than stretching beyond what we need.

I agree that ethically that would pose the same issue seen when talking about modern human genetic engineering, but more information of this new species could be revolutionary in our understanding of early man and might even look to support many claims of early existence seeing as this species looks to be the bridge between modern and earlier man. I would really like to see how research on this continues and the kinds of information they can uncover regarding them.


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